Monthly Archives: March 2017

March 27, 2017

Proposed Estate Tax Legislation

by Margot S. Edwards

There are several proposals to repeal the estate tax currently percolating in Congress.  None of these proposals appears to have been fully fleshed out, and it is unclear how the differences will be reconciled.  Notably, none of the proposals reflects the Trump campaign position supporting a “mark to market” tax to be imposed at death. Below is a brief summary of the currently proposed legislation, and the key differences between them.

H.R. 451:  Known as the “Permanently Repeal the Estate Tax Act of 2017,” this bill is the shortest.  It states simply that for “decedents dying after December 31, 2016, Chapter 11 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is repealed.”  This operates to repeal the estate tax, but to leave the gift tax and generation-skipping transfer tax in place. Read more >>

March 13, 2017

Now That You Have Accessed the Digital Assets, Don’t Forget to Value Them

by Jody H. Hall, Paralegal

It is well documented that all of our lives have become more data-driven and we are practically tethered to our electronic devices.  Therefore, it should not be surprising to realize that more and more of our assets, and those of our clients, have a digital component.  What may be surprising, however, is just how much value we place on our digital assets.  Surveys report that the average value of personal digital assets owned by individuals globally ranges from $35,000 – $55,000.

A few key words typed into any search engine, including a review of articles written on this blog, will provide a wealth of information on accessing digital assets, including digital assets in your clients’ estate planning documents, and safeguarding your digital assets inventory.  However, after the client’s death, once we have a list of their digital assets, and have gained access those assets, it is prudent for the probate and trust practitioner to remember to value those assets.  Read more >>

March 1, 2017

Digital Evidence and Privacy: Can you ask Alexa if mom’s incapacitated?

by Morgan Wiener

Much has been written on this blog about digital assets, and you have likely given some thought to the impact that this relatively new category of assets has on estate planning and administration.  But have you considered the other ways in which new digital devices and technologies might impact your practice and your clients’ lives?  If not, a murder case in Bentonville, Arkansas, home of Walmart, will give you something to think about.

James Bates is accused of murdering his coworker Victor Collins (yes, they both worked at Walmart) in a hot tub in November 2015.  On the night of the alleged murder, Bates’s Amazon Echo was streaming music through its speaker, and Bentonville police have issued a search warrant for the Echo’s recording from that night hoping it will shed light on what happened.

The Amazon Echo is a speaker and virtual assistant that works by constantly listening to background noise and conversation.  The virtual assistant, Alexa, is activated when the Echo hears someone say “Alexa.”  The background conversations are not recorded by the Echo, but anything said after Alexa is activated is recorded.  Because Bates’s Echo was streaming music on the night of the alleged murder, the police believe that it may have been activated and recording conversations. Read more >>